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A clinical study was conducted to assess the safety of Derma-Smoothe/FS Topical Oil®, which contains refined peanut oil, on subjects with known peanut allergies. The study enrolled 13 patients with atopic dermatitis, 6 to 17 years of age. Of the 13 patients, 9 were Radioallergosorbent Test (RAST) positive to peanuts and 4 had no peanut sensitivity (controls). The study evaluated the responses to both prick test and patch test utilizing peanut oil NF, Derma-Smoothe/FS Topical Oil® and histamine/saline controls on the 13 individuals. These subjects were also treated with Derma-Smoothe/FS Topical Oil® twice daily for 7 days. Prick test and patch test results for all 13 patients were negative to Derma-Smoothe/FS Topical Oil® and the refined peanut oil. One of the 9 peanut-sensitive patients experienced an exacerbation of atopic dermatitis after 5 days of Derma-Smoothe/FS Topical Oil® use. Importantly, the bulk peanut oil NF, used in Derma-Smoothe/FS Topical Oil® is heated at 475°F for at least 15 minutes, which should provide for adequate decomposition of allergenic proteins.

No metabolites of fluticasone propionate were detected in an in vitro study of radiolabeled fluticasone propionate incubated in a human skin homogenate. The total blood clearance of systemically absorbed fluticasone propionate averages 1,093 mL/min (range, 618 to 1,702 mL/min) after a 1-mg intravenous dose, with renal clearance accounting for less than % of the total. Fluticasone propionate is metabolized in the liver by cytochrome P450 3A4-mediated hydrolysis of the 5- fluoromethyl carbothioate grouping. This transformation occurs in 1 metabolic step to produce the inactive17-ß-carboxylic acid metabolite, the only known metabolite detected in man. This metabolite has approximately 2,000 times less affinity than the parent drug for the glucocorticoid receptor of human lung cytosol in vitro and negligible pharmacological activity in animal studies. Other metabolites detected in vitro using cultured human hepatoma cells have not been detected in man.

Corticosteroids have been used as drug treatment for some time. Lewis Sarett of Merck & Co. was the first to synthesize cortisone, using a complicated 36-step process that started with deoxycholic acid, which was extracted from ox bile . [43] The low efficiency of converting deoxycholic acid into cortisone led to a cost of US $200 per gram. Russell Marker , at Syntex , discovered a much cheaper and more convenient starting material, diosgenin from wild Mexican yams . His conversion of diosgenin into progesterone by a four-step process now known as Marker degradation was an important step in mass production of all steroidal hormones, including cortisone and chemicals used in hormonal contraception . [44] In 1952, . Peterson and . Murray of Upjohn developed a process that used Rhizopus mold to oxidize progesterone into a compound that was readily converted to cortisone. [45] The ability to cheaply synthesize large quantities of cortisone from the diosgenin in yams resulted in a rapid drop in price to US $6 per gram, falling to $ per gram by 1980. Percy Julian's research also aided progress in the field. [46] The exact nature of cortisone's anti-inflammatory action remained a mystery for years after, however, until the leukocyte adhesion cascade and the role of phospholipase A2 in the production of prostaglandins and leukotrienes was fully understood in the early 1980s.

Michael A. Ball, DVM, completed an internship in medicine and surgery and an internship in anesthesia at the University of Georgia in 1994, a residency in internal medicine, and graduate work in pharmacology at Cornell University in 1997, and was on staff at Cornell before starting Early Winter Equine Medicine & Surgery located in Ithaca, . He is also an FEI veterinarian and works internationally with the United States Equestrian Team. Ball authored Understanding The Equine Eye , Understanding Basic Horse Care , and Understanding Equine First Aid , published by Eclipse Press and available at or by calling 800/582-5604.

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Michael A. Ball, DVM, completed an internship in medicine and surgery and an internship in anesthesia at the University of Georgia in 1994, a residency in internal medicine, and graduate work in pharmacology at Cornell University in 1997, and was on staff at Cornell before starting Early Winter Equine Medicine & Surgery located in Ithaca, . He is also an FEI veterinarian and works internationally with the United States Equestrian Team. Ball authored Understanding The Equine Eye , Understanding Basic Horse Care , and Understanding Equine First Aid , published by Eclipse Press and available at or by calling 800/582-5604.

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