Steroid inhalation asthma

It’s common to worry about side effects from the medicines we take. But recent research has shown that the chance of side effects from taking a low dose of inhaled preventer medicine is very small.  It's worth remembering that the preventer dose will be kept as low as possible to protect you or your child against the inflammation that causes asthma symptoms. Using it every day, as prescribed, means you’re less likely to need your reliever inhaler or a prescription of oral steroid tablets which will mean higher doses of steroids.  

Whether airway hyperresponsiveness is a symptom of airway inflammation or airway remodeling, or whether it is the cause of long-term loss of lung function, remains controversial. Some investigators have hypothesized that aggressive treatment with anti-inflammatory therapies improves the long-term course of asthma beyond their salutary effects on parameters of asthma control and rates of exacerbation over time. 13 This contention has been supported by an observational study 14 that found long-term exposure to ICS was associated with an attenuation of the accelerated decline in lung function previously reported in asthmatics; more studies are required to substantiate these findings.

Inhaled Steroids (such as Flovent, Pulmicort, and Qvar): Inhaled steroids can be safely given daily for asthma maintenance control. Because the medication is only going to the lungs (where it is needed) and not to the rest of the body, none of the long-term side effects of oral steroids are experienced. There have been exhaustive studies demonstrating that inhaled steroids given daily are safe and effective, and are considered first line therapy for asthma maintenance. These medications generally take a week or more to reach maximal effectiveness. One should NEVER attempt to use these medications in place of a rescue inhaler for acute symptoms. Because these medications work slowly, we will often start patients on a 3-7 day oral steroid "burst." When the oral steroid is finished, we will often then start an inhaled steroid to safely continue daily anti-inflammatory maintenance therapy.

Discuss whether a change in controller medication or decrease in the dose or strength of the inhalant would be an option. Some health experts have reported a reduction in hoarseness after backing down the dose, but this is not always effective. There is a particular inhaled steroid which is inactive until it reaches the surface of the lung (after inhalation). It seems to be an ideal inhalant for people who have adverse effects which are localized to the throat or tongue. The brand name of this unique inhaled steroid is Alvesco. It is only available by prescription. Unfortunately no currently available steroid based inhaler, (including Alvesco) eliminates the risk of dysphonia. One study referenced below suggested reduced risk with some dry powder inhalers.

Antileukotriene agents in the management of asthma
Allergen avoidance in the treatment of asthma and allergic rhinitis
An overview of asthma management
Diagnosis of asthma in adolescents and adults
Evaluation of severe asthma in adolescents and adults
Identifying patients at risk for fatal asthma
Natural history of asthma
Severe asthma phenotypes
Management of acute exacerbations of asthma in adults
Treatment of intermittent and mild persistent asthma in adolescents and adults
Treatment of moderate persistent asthma in adolescents and adults
Treatment of severe asthma in adolescents and adults

The following organizations also provide reliable health information.

Steroid inhalation asthma

steroid inhalation asthma

Discuss whether a change in controller medication or decrease in the dose or strength of the inhalant would be an option. Some health experts have reported a reduction in hoarseness after backing down the dose, but this is not always effective. There is a particular inhaled steroid which is inactive until it reaches the surface of the lung (after inhalation). It seems to be an ideal inhalant for people who have adverse effects which are localized to the throat or tongue. The brand name of this unique inhaled steroid is Alvesco. It is only available by prescription. Unfortunately no currently available steroid based inhaler, (including Alvesco) eliminates the risk of dysphonia. One study referenced below suggested reduced risk with some dry powder inhalers.

Media:

steroid inhalation asthmasteroid inhalation asthmasteroid inhalation asthmasteroid inhalation asthmasteroid inhalation asthma

http://buy-steroids.org